Commit 8ea91dcb authored by Duncan White's avatar Duncan White

imported bugfixes from ~dcw/src/C/datadec/datadec-1.2 dir

parent 2c624798
Building on Solaris or Other Unices
-----------------------------------
Building on Unices
------------------
1. Extract the datadec-1.1.tgz file, creating a datadec-1.0 directory
1. Extract the datadec-1.2.tgz file, creating a datadec-1.2 directory
2. Compile datadec:
cd datadec-1.1
cd datadec-1.2
make
3. EITHER
a. Install it (run this as root) into /usr/local/bin and /usr/man/man1:
3. Install it (run this as root) into /usr/local/bin and /usr/share/man/man1:
make install
b. or, package datadec up and install it via adding the package:
cd PKG/Solaris
make
then install the package (as root):
pkgadd -d datadec-1.0-1-sol8-sparc-dcw all
4. check that datadec is now on your path, eg. rehash, which datadec
5. cd test; make; ./ctest
Building and Packaging Datadec on RPM-based Linux
-------------------------------------------------
Either download http://csgsoft.doc.ic.ac.uk/datadec/datadec-1.0-1.i386.rpm
and install it (rpm -i) from there, or do a source build:
Notes on Packaging
------------------
1. Download the datadec-1.1.tgz file and save it in your RPM SOURCES directory.
An alternative to (3) is to package datadec up and install it via installing
the package. There are many different packaging systems: over the years, we
have packaged datadec for Solaris, Redhat Linux and Debian/Ubuntu Linux, but
only the Debian/Ubuntu packaging is up to date.
2. Download the package spec file datadec.spec:
3. Build the package using the spec file:
- For Debian/Ubuntu/Debian-derived distros, the tarball includes the debian
subdirectory, this should work, invoke "dpkg-buildpackage -tc -rfakeroot"
as usual (on a machine with the debian packaging tools installed).
- Also in this directory is a (nontested) RPM .spec file, which may serve as
a basis for you to build an RPM, via
rpm -bb datadec.spec
4. Now you can install the datadec-1.1-1.is386.rpm that you just built,
using rpm -i..
(but it almost certainly won't work out of the box).
CC = gcc
#CC = cc
DEST = $(PREFIX)/usr
BINDIR = $(DEST)/bin
MANDIR = $(DEST)/man/man1
CFLAGS = -g -UDEBUGGING -Wall
CC = gcc
#CC = cc
DEST = $(PREFIX)/usr
BINDIR = $(DEST)/bin
MANDIR = $(DEST)/man/man1
CFLAGS = -g -UDEBUGGING -Wall
LDLIBS =
EXECS = datadec
EXECS = datadec
datadec_srcs = datadec.c parser.c lexer.c struct.c decs.c optimize.c
datadec_objs = datadec.o parser.o lexer.o struct.o decs.o optimize.o
datadec_srcs = datadec.c parser.c lexer.c struct.c decs.c optimize.c
datadec_objs = datadec.o parser.o lexer.o struct.o decs.o optimize.o
all: $(EXECS)
......@@ -19,6 +19,7 @@ install: $(EXECS)
clean:
/bin/rm -f *.o a.out core $(EXECS)
cd test; make clean
datadec: $(datadec_objs)
$(CC) -g -o datadec $(datadec_objs)
......
Datadec takes recursive data types modelled on those found in functional
languages (Hope, Miranda, Haskell etc) and generates ANSI C code to
implement them.
Datadec takes inductive (or recursive) data types modelled on those found in
functional languages (Hope, Miranda, Haskell etc) and generates ANSI C code
to implement them.
Duncan C. White, dcw@doc.ic.ac.uk
19th March 2002
New! experimental free functions (run datadec with new -f option)
Duncan C. White, d.white@imperial.ac.uk
28th May 2014
An Example of Datadec in Action
-------------------------------
......@@ -24,11 +29,11 @@ idtree = leaf( string id, illist l )
What does this mean?
The first rule declares that an intlist can take two basic "shapes" -
it is either empty, nil, or of the form cons(int,intlist).
nil and cons() are called constructors, and define different
it is either empty, aka nil, or of the form cons(int,intlist).
nil() and cons() are called constructors, and define different
"shapes" that objects of the type can take.
However, because the second argument of a cons() constructor is itself
an intlist, this type is said to be recursively defined.
an intlist, this type is said to be recursively or inductively defined.
Functional programmers will recognise nil or cons() as the standard
way of defining a list, so more intuitively, intlist is simply
a list of integers!
......@@ -42,6 +47,9 @@ module which implements all the data types, a constructor function for
each constructor, deconstructor functions to help you to take objects
apart again and printing functions to help you with debugging.
(Plus, new May 2014: a tree-walking free function if you invoke datadec
with the new -f option).
Building and Packaging datadec
------------------------------
......@@ -56,4 +64,3 @@ input file which declares some recursive data types (lists and trees),
and ctest.c is the test harness that uses them. cd into test and run make
to turn cdata.in into cx.h and cx.c, and to compile cx.c and ctest.c and
link them..
datadec (1.2) trusty; urgency=low
* added experimental free_TYPE() generation (-f option to datadec)
-- Duncan C. White <dcw@doc.ic.ac.uk> Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:06:06 +0100
datadec (1.1-1) unstable; urgency=low
* Initial release, created by dh_make as a test
......
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ BOOL parse_data( char *exports, char *globals, char *begin, declnlist *dp )
MUSTBE( tTYPE, "TYPE/EXPORT/GLOBAL/BEGIN expected" );
MUSTBE( tOPENCURLY, "{ expected" );
if( ! parse_declns( dp ) ) return FALSE;
MUSTBE( tCLOSECURLY, "{ expected" );
MUSTBE( tCLOSECURLY, "} expected" );
MUSTBE( tEOF, "Spurious characters found beyond EOF" );
return TRUE;
......@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ static BOOL parse_shape( char **tagname, paramlist *pl, printlist *print )
{
if( ! parse_params( pl ) ) return FALSE;
MUSTBE( tCLOSEBR, "')' expected" );
MUSTBE( tCLOSEBR, "',' or ')' expected" );
} else
{
ungettok();
......
DEST = $(TOOLDIR)
LIBDIR = $(DEST)/lib/$(ARCH)
INCDIR = $(DEST)/include
CFLAGS = -I. -I$(INCDIR) -g -UDEBUGGING -Wall
CFLAGS = -I. -I$(INCDIR) -g -UDEBUGGING -Wall
LDLIBS = -L$(LIBDIR) -lmem
TESTEXECS = ctest
AUTOCRAP = ctest.o cx.[och]
......
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